Is It Easy to Switch from Violin to Viola: The Pros and Cons

Making the switch from violin to viola can be a big decision. Both instruments have four strings but have their own unique sounds and benefits, so it’s important to consider all of the pros and cons before making a final decision.

In this blog post, we will take a look at some of the key similarities and differences between these two instruments. We’ll also discuss why making the switch might be a good or bad idea for you, based on your individual needs and preferences. So if you’re thinking about making the switch, read on!

Is It Easy to Switch from Violin to Viola: The Pros and Cons

What Are the Similarities and Differences Between Violin and Viola

What Are the Similarities and Differences Between Violin and Viola

Violin and viola are both string instruments that are played with a bow. They share many similarities, but there are also some key differences.

For example, violins are smaller than violas, which can make them easier to hold and play for younger musicians. Yet, in saying this, the smallest viola is smaller than a full-sized violin, so there is some crossover.

The viola is bigger than the violin and has a thicker body, so you might have a tendency to play your fourth finger in particular flat when you switch back and forth.

Another difference is that the violin’s strings are tuned in perfect fifths, while the viola’s strings are tuned in perfect fourths.

This gives the viola a deeper, richer sound than the violin. Despite these differences, both instruments are capable of producing beautiful music.

Why Making the Switch Might Be a Good or Bad Idea for You

Why Making the Switch Might Be a Good or Bad Idea for You

There are a few reasons why you might want to consider making the switch from violin to viola.

For one, violas tend to have a richer, fuller sound than violins, which can be more pleasing to the ear.

Additionally, violas are often used in orchestral music, so making the switch can open up new opportunities for you as a musician.

Of course, there are also some potential downsides to consider. Violas are generally larger and heavier than violins, which can make them more difficult to play.

Additionally, because they are less common than violins, it can be harder to find teachers and resources for learning how to play the viola.

Ultimately, whether or not making the switch is the right decision for you will come down to your own preferences and goals as a musician.

How to Know if The Switch Is Right for You

How to Know if The Switch Is Right for You

Of course, there are also some drawbacks to switching from violin to viola. For one, it can be more expensive to purchase a quality viola than it is a violin and comes with additional learning.

Additionally, violas can be more difficult to play because of their size and weight. If you’re thinking about making the switch, it’s important to try both instruments before making a final decision.

The Benefits of Playing Both Instruments

You might want to be a player of both instruments – a violinist who also knows how to play the viola – if you’re looking for the best of both worlds. Playing both instruments gives you a wider range of options when it comes to repertoire and musical opportunities. Additionally, it can make you a more well-rounded musician overall.

One of the things you have to keep in mind when you’re playing both the violin and viola is that the clef changes. For instance, a lot of violin music is in treble clef, but viola music is in alto clef.

So if you’re reading music for both instruments, you have to be able to adjust quickly between the two clefs.

Additionally, the range of notes is different on violin and viola. Violin goes up to about fourth position, but viola has a much lower range so you have to learn how to play in first, second, and third positions.

Finally, bowing techniques are also different on the two instruments. For example, on violin you often use more aggressive strokes, while on viola you use smoother strokes. So when you’re making the switch between Violin and viola, there are a few things to keep in mind!

The Costs of Switching from Violin to Viola

The Costs of Switching from Violin to Viola

Buying a new instrument will set you back a few bucks, but if you have already factored that in – D Z Strad made some amazing bits. They also do handmade violas 😍!

While it’s true that you’ll need to purchase a new instrument, the cost of lessons and materials shouldn’t be ignored.

When it comes to lessons, most private instructors charge by the hour. While rates will vary depending on your location, you can expect to pay anywhere from $30 to $50 per hour for quality instruction.

If you plan on taking weekly lessons, that can add up quickly. In addition to private lessons, you may also need to purchase a viola method book or two. These can range in price from $20 to $40 each.

Of course, the biggest expense will be the instrument itself. A quality viola can cost anywhere from $500 to $5,000. If you’re renting an instrument, you can expect to pay around $50 per month.

When all is said and done, switching from violin to viola is not a cheap endeavor. Be sure to factor in all of the costs before making a final decision. With proper planning and budgeting, however, making the switch is certainly within reach for many aspiring violists.

The Time Commitment of Switching Instruments

Another thing to consider if you’re thinking about making the switch from violin to viola is the time commitment.

It will take time to learn how to play the new instrument, and you’ll need to be patient as you adjust to the size and weight of the viola.

If you’re not willing to commit the time and effort, it might not be worth making the switch.

Although it is not entirely like learning a brand new instrument, there is a significant learning curve when making the switch from violin to viola.

You’ll need to be patient and dedicate time to practice if you want to be successful.

How to Make the Switch

Making the switch from violin to viola can be a big adjustment, but it can also be a lot of fun. In addition to these recommended books, here are a few things to keep in mind as you make the transition:

Warm-up:

First, you’ll want to warm up more than you usually would. The larger size of the viola means that your muscles will need to work a little harder, so it’s important to give them a chance to stretch out.

By warming up before you play, you’ll help prevent injuries and ease the transition into playing the viola.

Play Scales:

Second, you’ll want to play scales. The larger distances between the notes on the viola can be challenging at first, but practicing scales will help you get used to the new layout.

Technique:

You’ll also need to adjust your technique when playing the viola. The notes on the violin are played with the first or third finger, and the notes on the viola are played with the open two or four fingers. This means that you’ll need to use a different part of your hand when playing the viola.

Additionally, because the viola is larger and heavier than the violin, you’ll need to use more arm and wrist movement when playing.

Posture:

Additionally, you’ll want to pay attention to your posture. You’ll need to adjust your posture to accommodate the new instrument and its weight.

Experiment:

Finally, don’t be afraid to experiment. The viola has a unique sound, so allow yourself to experiment with different techniques and see what you can create.

The Tune Up….

So, is it easy to switch from violin to viola? Yes! I would say it is, all things considered. If you’re thinking about making the switch, be sure to set some time and money aside and enjoy being able to switch seemlessly between playing both: remember – treble clef for violin and alto clef for viola!

I hope you enjoyed this blog post. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to reach out to me. I would love to hear from you.

Happy playing! 🙂